A4J unites in solidarity against violence targeting trans communities of color

A4J unites in solidarity against violence targeting trans communities of color

Adoptees For Justice unites in solidarity against violence targeting trans communities of color, particularly the Black trans community and calls for stronger police accountability. 

We recognize and condemn the deaths of Tony McDade, Nina Pop, and too many other Black trans people who have been murdered and harassed by police and others in acts of racism and transphobia. While their names were not included in our initial statement, the sad reality is that there are far too many Black people who have been killed by police than can be named in a single statement. Nevertheless, we support the Black trans community, who face more hostility, harassment, and discrimination on a daily basis just for being who they are. Our commitment to an intersectional framework of organizing compels us to recognize and name also the disproportionate amount of violence faced by Black trans individuals due to both racism and transphobia among the police and our society. The LGBTQ civil rights organization Human Rights Campaign cites at least 12 trans people have already been killed this year alone. As we head into LGBTQ+ Pride month, we must remember its origins at the Stonewall Inn led by trans activists of color, Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, in resistance to continued police harassment and raids. We must speak out against these injustices in ongoing conversations on police violence against the Black community. 

While some may question the inclusion of Tony McDade’s name because of circumstances surrounding his death, we have seen over and over that police are capable of de-escalating and subduing white people like mass shooters Dylann Roof (Charleston Church Massacre) and James Holmes (Aurora Movie Theater Mass Shooting). We believe everyone has rights. We have due process and a justice system for a reason, and police are not supposed to act as judge, jury, and executioner in deciding who gets brought in and who gets killed in the street. We must stay focused on demanding justice and accountability for the police officers who killed or were complicit in the deaths of Black people in their custody, and calling for major systemic reforms to the criminal legal system that disproportionately harms Black people in this country. 

We call on the Adoptee Community to unite in solidarity against violence targeting trans communities of color, particularly the Black trans community.

In Solidarity, 

Adoptees for Justice